The monetary system of the late Roman Empire
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The monetary system of the late Roman Empire 293-348 by Branko DrДЌa

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Published by Blago Sirmijuma, Serbian Archeological Society, Central Institute for Conservation in Belgrade in Sremska Mitrovica, Belgrade .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Money,
  • Roman Coins,
  • Monetary policy,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-249).

StatementBranko Drča
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG237 .D7513 2011
The Physical Object
Pagination249 p. :
Number of Pages249
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25112306M
ISBN 109788684457075
LC Control Number2011475843

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The first volume of this work,State and Currency in the Roman Empire to A.D.2,has now been published. The book is the product of a lifelong study of a central theme of economic history, and it unquestionably justifies.   Most people have some idea what Greeks and Romans coins looked like, but few know how complex Greek and Roman monetary systems eventually became. The contributors to this volume are numismatists, ancient historians, and economists intent on investigating how these systems worked and how they both did and did not resemble a modern monetary : OUP Oxford. Most people have some idea what Greeks and Romans coins looked like, but few know how complex Greek and Roman monetary systems eventually became. The contributors to this book are numismatists, ancient historians, and economists intent on investigating how these systems worked and how they both did and did not resemble a modern monetary system. By BC, a monetary system emerged in Rome providing a full complement of denominations. These new standardized bronze denominations are known as “Aes Grave” and begin to form a monetary system that to this day still influences modern society. AE As = Roman pound of bronze 12 uncia AE Semis = half As or 6 uncia.

  In Diocletian's time, in the year , he fixed the price at 50, denarii for one pound of gold. Ten years later it had risen to , In , 23 years after it , it was now , In , the year of Constantine's death, a pound of gold brou, denarii.   Monetary sphere: Constantine founded the new monetary system on gold and there were vast amounts of this in circulation. Constantine’s chief innovations were in the monetary sphere, where he introduced a new denomination, the solidus, a coin of 4½ gm of pure gold that would in fact outlast the Roman Empire itself. Roman empire.2 These similarities likewise warrant comparative investigation in the future. 2. Pre-imperial coinage in ancient China With regard to the mythical and semi-mythical distant past, later textual sources ascribe monetary uses to a variety of objects such . More casual readers might be dismayed to see The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire recommended so highly — the Penguin Classics edition, after all, runs to three volumes, weighing in at more than a thousand pages apiece. But there’s a reason this English classic has had more staying power than Elizabeth II: it’s a monumental work of scholarship — and also a lot more.

Bolin’s work on State and Currency in the Roman Empire was the first to analyse seriously the role of the Roman monetary system in connection to the state.9 His elaborate statistical analysis and theoretical mathematics effectively undermined the value of his writings and placed him in the disreputable modernist group. books based on 41 votes: The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians by Peter Heather, The Decline and Fall of the Roman E. The monetary system of the Roman Empire underwent a considerable number of changes during the reign of Constantine. While he was still only junior partner holding the rank of Caesar, Constantine reduced the weight of the follis at the mints then under his control (London, Lugdunum and Treveri) and again reduced it soon after his elevation to the rank of Augustus (March, AD). / David M. Schaps --Money and tragedy / Richard Seaford --The elasticity of the money-supply at Athens / Edward E. Cohen --Coinage as 'code' in Ptolemaic Egypt / J.G. Manning --The demand for money in the late Roman Republic / David B. Hollander --Money and prices in the early Roman Empire / David Kessler and Peter Temin --The function of gold.